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Our wildlife is disappearing

Almost two thirds of species in the UK have declined in the past 50 years. There’s nothing natural or inevitable about this. It can be stopped. And everyone can play a part. That’s why People’s Trust for Endangered Species exists. Donate Read more Almost two thirds of species in the UK have declined in the past 50 years. There’s nothing natural or inevitable about this. It can be stopped. And everyone can play a part. That’s why People’s Trust for Endangered Species exists.

Our wildlife is disappearing

Read more Donate Almost two thirds of species in the UK have declined in the past 50 years. There’s nothing natural or inevitable about this. It can be stopped. And everyone can play a part. That’s why People’s Trust for Endangered Species exists. Read more Donate
Common-Blue-butterfly---polyommatus-icarus-antb-Shutterstock

Action for wildlife

There are some easy steps you can take to turn your outdoor space into a haven for local wildlife. We’ve compiled some ideas on how you can do this, all from the comfort of your own home. Give nature a helping hand by growing plants for pollinators, building a log pile for stag beetles, or making a home for hedgehogs. Help wildlife in your garden There are some easy steps you can take to turn your outdoor space into a haven for local wildlife. We’ve compiled some ideas on how you can do this, all from the comfort of your own home. Give nature a helping hand by growing plants for pollinators, building a log pile for stag beetles, or making a home for hedgehogs. Action for wildlife Help wildlife in your garden

From anteaters to zebras, Argentina to Zimbabwe, we support projects that have significant impact.

Everything we do is based on scientific evidence. Our grant projects, funded by our generous supporters, are building on this evidence and guiding our worldwide conservation work. Read more

From anteaters to zebras, Argentina to Zimbabwe, we support projects that have significant impact.

Everything we do is based on scientific evidence. Our grant projects, funded by our generous supporters, are building on this evidence and guiding our worldwide conservation work. Read more

From anteaters to zebras, Argentina to Zimbabwe, we support projects that have significant impact.

Read more

Who we are

We’ve been standing up for wildlife for over 40 years. With the help of scientists, conservationists, landowners, and the general public, we’re working to protect our delicately balanced ecosystem by bringing our most threatened species back from the brink.

Where we work

Funded by our generous supporters, our grant programmes support the very best scientific researchers and wildlife experts out in the field. The evidence they unearth guides worldwide conservation. Browse the map below to discover the amazing wildlife we’re saving from extinction.

Latest appeal

Grevy’s zebras in east Kenya

Help us support our established colleague, and award-winning conservationist Ali Hussein, protect the overlooked Grevy’s zebras in east Kenya.
Grevy’s zebras are the largest and most threatened of the three zebra species. There are only about 2,500 left in the wild. Habitat loss and drought are their biggest threats, while most are part of conservation plans, some isolated herds in east Kenya have been largely forgotten. But Ali lives in this area and is going to get these zebras back on the map, one by one, so they can be protected.
Read more Donate
Conservation partnerships

Supporting global experts

Our Conservation Partnerships Programme supports leading conservationists around the globe. Each partner receives up to £100,000 over 5 years to help our most endangered species.
Learn more
Help wildlife

Help wildlife at home

Download our Garden Guides for advice on how to make your green space more wildlife friendly, from how to plant a fruit tree, to building a home for hedgehogs. #WildlifeFriendlyGarden
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Latest news from PTES

Cheetah conservation in Botswana: Training dogs and teaching children in the Western Kalahari

As last year drew to a close we received a lovely message from Rebecca Klein of Cheetah Conservation Botswana (CCB). With your kind support, we’ve been helping Rebecca build a brighter future for cheetahs. Thankfully there have been relatively low COVID-19 infection rates in Botswana. Despite the government restricting movement, Rebecca and her team were …

Cute but deadly: slow lorises and venom

Slow lorises may look cute and cuddly but these large-eyed primates are deadly and use venom to injure and even kill other slow lorises. Recent research has shown that slow lorises use venom as a defense mechanism against others of its kind, something that has previously only been seen in four other species worldwide. Only …

Conservation and coppicing

Pete Etheridge writes about the importance of coppicing for woodland conservation and biodiversity. A decline in coppicing Coppicing has been practised in the UK for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. In 1905 (decades after the peak in coppicing activity), it was estimated that there was somewhere in the region of 230,000 ha of actively …

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