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Citizen Science Day 2019 – take part in a survey today

Home // News // Citizen Science Day 2019 – take part in a survey today

Conservation needs you

“One of the most important things in conservation is socialisation, awareness and education with the local people”

Anna Nekaris, Little Fireface Project

In many instances, for conservation to work it has to involve local communities, it has to resolve the conflicts that sometimes arise between wildlife and humans, it has to recognise cultural values and make use of indigenous knowledge. People are what conservation is all about.

So fast are we losing the natural world, and on such a scale, that conservation has to think big – and ‘citizen science’ has stepped up to the mark.

Saturday (13th April) is Citizen Science Day 2019, recognising the science carried out by non-professional scientists. Public-participation surveys of wildlife are nothing new in Britain. Large-scale, public surveys of bird behaviour, run by the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) go back to the first half of the last century, collecting records of paper-tearing and pecking of foil milk bottle-tops. More recently, the advent of the worldwide web and smart’ mobile devices with GPS, large displays, cameras and the ability to run specialised apps, means it’s never been easier to collect and analyse data on a big scale.


“One thing we did wrong in Sweden was to concentrate on animals, not people.”


Tom Arnbom, WWF-Sweden

Get involved today

So what better way to mark the day than by signing up to PTES’ Living with Mammals survey, which runs until the end of June. The project records sightings and field signs of mammals in the green spaces stretching through our towns and cities – from gardens and allotments to railway embankments and common ground.

Conservation is intricately bound up with people. Noticing wildlife, talking about it, recording it, are important for individuals and for communities, and citizen-science brings the potential of people-powered conservation.


Register to join the 2019 Living with Mammals survey today!

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